Study on negative effects of headphone use by teens appears in media nationally

MSN Health and Fitness, Businessweek and 20 health publications feature a study on the use of personal music players by teens by Abbey Berg, a professor in the biologyand health sciences department at Pace.  

Personal music players may pose a major risk to hearing if they’re played too loudly or for too long, the study shows.

The 24-year study included 8,710 teenage girls from disadvantaged families. Between 1985 and 2008, high-frequency hearing loss — a common result of excessive noise exposure — among the girls nearly doubled, from 10.1 percent to 19.2 percent. While the findings show an association between personal music players and hearing problems, they do not show cause-and-effect.

Read more:

http://health.msn.com/health-topics/ears-nose-throat/articlepage.aspx?cp-documentid=100262919

NBC New York: A study by Pace’s Energy and Climate Center results in pressure on Con Ed

A study by the Pace Energy and Climate Center reveals the true financial impact of the 2006 Queens Blackout which left 200,000 people in Queens without power for nine days.

The heat on Con Edison continues spurred by a just-released study managed by Jamie Van Nostrand of the Pace Energy and Climate Center. The study reveals the true financial impact of the 2006 Queens Blackout which left 200,000 people in Astoria, Long Island City, Sunnyside and Woodside without power for nine days. Van Nostrand’s research shows “the utility reimbursed Queens customers for $17 million, out of $188 million in blackout losses.”
 
Tim Minton, reporting for “Today in New York” on WNBC-TV, went one-on-one with Con Edison’s CEO as the temperatures rise to just about the highest they’ve been since the blackout occurred. Watch a replay of the interview by clicking on this video link –

On NBC New York: Pace Energy and Climate Center study puts pressure on Con Ed