Two Nursing Spectrum articles feature Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing

Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing associate professor and chairperson Martha J. Greenberg, RN, PhD and professor and chairperson of the Lienhard graduate department Rona F. Levin, RN, PhD were quoted in an article about the changes in nursing education and in the nursing industry within the last decade.

Lienhard was featured in an another article about their newest ardiopulmonary patient simulator called “Harvey” as well.

Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing associate professor and chairperson Martha J. Greenberg, RN, PhD and professor and chairperson of the Lienhard graduate department Rona F. Levin, RN, PhD were quoted in an article about the changes in nursing education and in the nursing industry within the last decade. Now, nurses focus less on tasks, and more on scientific concepts and asking clinical questions. Levin explains how the integration of evidence-based practice in RN education continues to evolve, while Greenberg discusses the launch of the new and improved nursing curriculum at Pace.

http://news.nurse.com/article/20100712/NY02/107120038

Rona F. Levin

A second article in Nursing Spectrum features Lienhard’s newest patient, a cardiopulmonary patient simulator called “Harvey.” It simulates 30 cardiac diseases and can be programmed to have various conditions which students can diagnose and treat. The school received this, along with an $87,500 grant from the Hugoton Foundation. “Harvey” allows for hands-on learning and will hone the skills of nursing students.

Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing staff, from left, Mary Ann McDevitt, RN, director of the Learning Resource Center; Lucille Ferrara, RN, assistant professor; Teresa Haines, RN, assistant professor; Joanne Singleton, RN, professor and family nurse practitioner, Doctor of Nursing Practice Program director; Susan Cappelmann, RPA-C, MT (ASCP), assistant clinical professor, associate director of the Physician Assistant Studies Program; Lin Drury, RN, assistant professor; and Jeff Chianfagna, MS, RPA-C, assistant clinical professor, academic faculty of the Physician Assistant Program.

Letter from Pace Professor Marilyn Jaffe-Ruiz published in New York Times

Pace Professor Marilyn Jaffe-Ruiz spoke out in the Opinion section of the New York Times about the nursing shortage and Nurse-Patient Ratios.

Pace Professor Marilyn Jaffe-Ruiz spoke out in the Opinion section of the New York Times about the nursing shortage and Nurse-Patient Ratios.

Check out the letter below:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/03/opinion/lweb03nurse.html?emc=eta1

Nurse.com Features Pace University’s Gerrie Colombraro in an Article about Male Nurses

Associate Dean for administration at Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing speaks about inclusivity for male nurses in the university.

 

Nurse.com: New York, New Jersey Educators Say More Men Are Becoming Nurses. . . . . Gerrie Colombraro, RN, PhD, is associate dean for administration at Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace, where the percentage of male nurses in the undergraduate program is 9%. She says that although the school does not specifically recruit males, the atmosphere of inclusivity comes through in PowerPoint demonstrations to potential students.

“When you look at the picture of what our group looks like, we have men and women from virtually every ethnic group you can imagine, ranging in age from the early 20s to the 50s,” Colombraro says. “I hear men say, anecdotally, ‘I could be comfortable there. I wouldn’t be the only man in the room.’”

. . . Colombraro said some of the stereotypes that men are worse at communication and women are worse at math don’t hold up in her experience. She says she doesn’t see a more favorable response to male as opposed to female graduates when they enter the workforce.

“There are some men who do really, really well with communication skills, and you would typically think of that as a female-type skill,” Colombraro says. “By the same token, in our program, women and men have to be equally skilled in math. When you’re dealing with medications that will save a patient’s life or kill them, everybody has to be strong in math.”