Pace Study Featured in The Wall Street Journal

A Wall Street Journal article about the plight of small businesses includes results from a just-released study managed by Jamie Van Nostrand/Pace Energy and Climate Center on the impact of the July 2006 Con Edison power outage in Western Queens.

A Wall Street Journal article about the plight of small businesses includes results from a just-released study managed by Jamie Van Nostrand/Pace Energy and Climate Center on the impact of the July 2006 Con Edison power outage in Western Queens. The study was mentioned in articles nationwide in outlets including the Associated Press.

Read more at  http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704684604575381313880000710.html

NBC New York: A study by Pace’s Energy and Climate Center results in pressure on Con Ed

A study by the Pace Energy and Climate Center reveals the true financial impact of the 2006 Queens Blackout which left 200,000 people in Queens without power for nine days.

The heat on Con Edison continues spurred by a just-released study managed by Jamie Van Nostrand of the Pace Energy and Climate Center. The study reveals the true financial impact of the 2006 Queens Blackout which left 200,000 people in Astoria, Long Island City, Sunnyside and Woodside without power for nine days. Van Nostrand’s research shows “the utility reimbursed Queens customers for $17 million, out of $188 million in blackout losses.”
 
Tim Minton, reporting for “Today in New York” on WNBC-TV, went one-on-one with Con Edison’s CEO as the temperatures rise to just about the highest they’ve been since the blackout occurred. Watch a replay of the interview by clicking on this video link –

On NBC New York: Pace Energy and Climate Center study puts pressure on Con Ed

Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. appears on ‘Hardball with Chris Matthews’ on the Gulf oil spill

Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., president of Waterkeeper Alliance and a professor at Pace University who‘s looking into the gulf oil spill, appeared on ‘Hardball with Chris Matthews.’

“The agency during the Bush administration which is responsible for promulgating regulations and for exercising oversight of the industry really became just a sock puppet for the oil industry. They almost completely ceased any kind of oversight, and they relied instead on what they call the voluntary regimen so that the industry would regulate itself.
“And one of the outcomes of that we know was that the—that the Deep Water Horizon, the drill rig on which this tragedy occurred, was not equipped with a piece of equipment, which was an acoustical dead man‘s switch, which BP—which is required in Europe. It‘s required in Brazil and other nations. It‘s used almost universally by the oil industry all over the world.  But BP was not required to use it.
“Although BP uses these on its own oil rigs in the North Sea, it was not required to use it in this country. And that‘s—and the reason for that was because this agency, the Minerals Management agency, really had simply lost—had a seamless relationship with big oil.”
Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.
Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.

MSNBC: Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., president of Waterkeeper Alliance and a professor at Pace University who‘s looking into the gulf oil spill, appeared on ‘Hardball with Chris Matthews’:

The Journal News Commends Pace’s Environmental Endeavors

Pace University devotes an entire website to the environment. There you can find information about sustainability practices across Pace’s New York City and Westchester campuses, whether its use of energy and water, its green buildings and landscaping or student initiatives.

Journal News: Colleges, students embrace ‘green’ spirit . . . Pace University’s environmental endeavors are extensive enough that it devotes an entire website to them: Pace University Environmental Gateway.

There you can find information about sustainability practices across Pace’s New York City and Westchester campuses, whether its use of energy and water, its green buildings and landscaping or student initiatives.
There are sections on degree programs, international opportunities, internships and clinics and student organizations. The site is maintained by the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies.
. . . Pace has signed onto New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s PlaNYC, his initiative to green New York City by reducing carbon emissions 30 percent by 2030.
Pace is striving to reduce its greenhouse gases in 10 years, said Michelle Land, the director of the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies. It has already cut its emissions 5 percent since 2007.

“Environmental health is so critical to human health,” Land said. “They just go hand in hand so there’s that recognition that those things have to be addressed in the most innovative way possible.”